Archive for July, 2010

Don’t reserve your best business thinking for your career.
Clayton M. Christensen is the Robert and Jane Cizik Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School.

Copyright © 2010 Harvard Business School Publishing. All rights reserved. Harvard Business Publishing is an affiliate of Harvard Business School.

Editor’s Note: When the members of the class of 2010 entered business school, the economy was strong and their post-graduation ambitions could be limitless. Just a few weeks later, the economy went into a tailspin. They’ve spent the past two years recalibrating their worldview and their definition of success.

The students seem highly aware of how the world has changed (as the sampling of views in this article shows). In the spring, Harvard Business School’s graduating class asked HBS professor Clay Christensen to address them—but not on how to apply his principles and thinking to their post-HBS careers. The students wanted to know how to apply them to their personal lives. He shared with them a set of guidelines that have helped him find meaning in his own life. Though Christensen’s thinking comes from his deep religious faith, we believe that these are strategies anyone can use. And so we asked him to share them with the readers of HBR. (more…)

Innovation and the small business

Posted: July 20, 2010 by vikmuse in Idea Factory
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Why do businesses innovate, and what is the big deal about innovation anyway? I mean, isn’t it just a case of taking apart an invention and tweak it to make it more appealing and saleable? Sounds like a sure fire winner to me, and just the ticket for anyone out there sharp enough to see the potential of a new invention. And, there lies the rub – the ability to see the potential. (more…)

Much has been written about corporate culture, and much more will. There are studies, dissertations, discussions and many examples out there of good and bad corporate culture. Still, what is ‘good’ to some is ‘bad’ to others and vice-versa. Which leaves the rest of us in a pickle and we ask “is corporate culture subjective, and based on shifting perceptions, alliances, moods, and market share?” (more…)

Racing heart and slightly sweaty palms as I approach the posting of my first blog. It is one thing to say what you mean at the spur of the moment to friends, and newly made acquaintances. The friends will give that rolled up eyes look that say “that’s just him going off again”. Newly made acquaintances will:

A) think you are strange and move away;

B) think you are strange and want to hear you more; or,

C) file under daft. (more…)

This post is part of a 5 part series on Business Modelling, Collective Intelligence & Innovation. You can read Part 1 here; and Part 2 here.

In Part 2 of this series on Business models, collective intelligence and its importance in innovation, we discussed the need to understand value chain contexts, and to possess the capability of re-articulating existing assets to seek out new competitive advantage.

In this part of the series, we have presented a case study of Apple – and analysed some of Apple’s biggest and most disruptive successes.

Case 1: Apple | United States of America

Apple iPod:

Here is a brainteaser. Did Apple really invent the iPod? (more…)

This post is 5 part series on Business Modelling, Collective Intelligence & Innovation (read Part 1 of this series here.)

So, what does Re(i)nnovate™ mean? What is its context in the world of business model innovation?

I have been reading, debating, discussing, and advising on innovation for some time now. And in all these interactions, one thing has stood out – that organisations must innovate or they will perish. Put differently, innovate now, or pale into irrelevance.

That ultimatum made me think. It is not as if the big, medium, and small corporations of the world did not innovate. They did get here – somehow. There must be something that they must have done right. And doing things right does not mean that they went into copy-cat mode or simply repeated a successful business model, process, product, service, or a combination thereof. They did something right. And that premise is unshakable.

Yet, how is it that these very organisations are now faced with a threat of survival? Surely, something is wrong with the basic assumption here. Or is it? (more…)